Religious Teachings: Didacticism in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower (Geneva B. and Marilyn S.)

Lauren Olamina, the protagonist of Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower engages with readers by unravelling her unique religious beliefs over the course of the novel. Her character’s personal development is closely linked with the development of her own religion. Earthseed is based in the recognition of the importance of change. God is change. Everything, … Continue reading Religious Teachings: Didacticism in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower (Geneva B. and Marilyn S.)

Hyperempathy Syndrome and Normative Girlhood in Parable of the Sower (Kho S and Rachel W)

In Parable of the Sower, the main character Lauren has a fictional disease called hyper empathy syndrome, meaning she feels the pain and the pleasure of others. In their introduction, Day, Green-Barteet, and Monz discuss the Currie, Kelly, and Pomerantz article which states that narratives surrounding girlhood have “positioned young women in a space that … Continue reading Hyperempathy Syndrome and Normative Girlhood in Parable of the Sower (Kho S and Rachel W)

The Hunger Games: How Katniss Breaks the Mold of Your Typical Female Protagonist While Simultaneously Reinforcing the Constructs of Girlhood (Cass M and Danielle T)

The Hunger Games, a young adult dystopian novel, is written with an emphasis on the female protagonist, Katniss Everdeen.  The book deals with heavy tropes regarding politics, quality of life, and rebellion. On the surface, these themes may seem to out shine the sub themes of love and girlhood.  Through a deeper analysis, one can recognize … Continue reading The Hunger Games: How Katniss Breaks the Mold of Your Typical Female Protagonist While Simultaneously Reinforcing the Constructs of Girlhood (Cass M and Danielle T)

Fashion as Argument in The Hunger Games (By Marie R. and Jessica I.)

Panem is a country that is under constant surveillance by the Capitol through the enforcement of laws and Peacekeepers. As a result, citizens of the twelve districts must self-monitor to ensure they fall in line with the Capitol’s expectations. If not, they face a range of punishments from whippings to slavery to death. The question … Continue reading Fashion as Argument in The Hunger Games (By Marie R. and Jessica I.)

Just Another Relationship to Sell: A Look at the Failed Romance in The Hunger Games (Presley S. and Emma B.)

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins is a novel that has arguably become one of the most popular young adult dystopian novels of this generation. It has joined the ranks of novels like Twilight, where the two male figures have been pitted against the other in order to win the heroine’s affection. Similar to other … Continue reading Just Another Relationship to Sell: A Look at the Failed Romance in The Hunger Games (Presley S. and Emma B.)

Post-Separation Studies: Race and Gender in Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (Laura B. and Aesha N.)

In her novel Orleans, Sherri L. Smith “connects the past to the future by imagining Hurricane Katrina to be the first in a series of extreme weather events leading to a post-Apocalyptic New Orleans” (Coleman 1). Smith’s post-apocalyptic New Orleans, however, disproportionately exposes women and Black individuals to devastation. Smith’s imagined world thereby examines gender … Continue reading Post-Separation Studies: Race and Gender in Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (Laura B. and Aesha N.)

Using the Delta Fever to Reassert AIDS into the Current Discourse: An Analysis of Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (By Sam E. and Alison R.)

In Sherri L. Smith’s novel Orleans, disease is a key plot element. We argue that the Delta Fever (DF) parallels HIV/AIDS through the construction of the disease as a blood-borne virus treated as highly contagious by caretakers. Gross, Goldsmith and Carruth argue that HIV/AIDS discourse for young people has been silenced. Referencing Michel Foucault, we … Continue reading Using the Delta Fever to Reassert AIDS into the Current Discourse: An Analysis of Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (By Sam E. and Alison R.)

“You speak like a little lady and your skin be smooth”: Blood and Bodily Purity in Orleans (Abbie J and Sarah L)

The society presented in Sherri Smith’s Orleans is not emphatically divided by race, class, or gender. Unlike other YA dystopian protagonists (such as Katniss Everdeen or Pressia Belze), Fen de la Guerre does not live in a culture of Have and Have Not. Instead, the ruins of New Orleans are divided among blood tribes, and … Continue reading “You speak like a little lady and your skin be smooth”: Blood and Bodily Purity in Orleans (Abbie J and Sarah L)

‘She Knows the Doll Head Because it’s Part of Her’: The Body in Pure (By Noortje K, Jen T and Alexandria R)

The construction of Pressia’s body in Pure sees signifiers inscribed on the body in a very literal way. Foucalt sees the body as an ‘object and target of power’—it can be ‘manipulated and shaped’ (136), and the population outside the Dome have bodies that have been literally manipulated and shaped by the Detonation. This theme … Continue reading ‘She Knows the Doll Head Because it’s Part of Her’: The Body in Pure (By Noortje K, Jen T and Alexandria R)

Creepily Twisted YA Tropes in Julianna Baggott’s Pure (Madyson White and Selena Huband)

Julianna Baggott’s Pure is a Young Adult novel that, from a first appearance, seems like a typical YA dystopian that follows the tropes of the genre. Pure contains a great deal of these tropes but it also distorts them to set the tone of a darker dystopian novel. Some of the twisted tropes of YA … Continue reading Creepily Twisted YA Tropes in Julianna Baggott’s Pure (Madyson White and Selena Huband)