Construction of Girlhood and Femininity in Marissa Meyers Cinder: Disposing of the Damsel in Distress (Lydia W. and Chloe H.)

Published in 2014, Marissa Meyer’s Cinder retells Charles Perrault’s traditional fairy-tale Cinderella. Perrault’s Cinderella, despite being published in 1697 has and still holds an influential position in children’s literature. Meyer reconstructs the traditional, beloved tale of Cinderella by taking key points of the domestic patriarchal-led story and rewriting it through a feminist lens. Justyna Deszcz … Continue reading Construction of Girlhood and Femininity in Marissa Meyers Cinder: Disposing of the Damsel in Distress (Lydia W. and Chloe H.)

Subverting the Princess Narrative in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Diana B. and Alessia M.)

The 1950’s Disney produced film Cinderella, was one of best American animated and one of the most popularized films ever to be made. While young girls adored the idea of sparkling glass slippers, pumpkins that transformed into twinkling chariots, and ever-so dreamy yet unattainable princes, the Disney princess has been widely criticized by feminist scholars … Continue reading Subverting the Princess Narrative in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Diana B. and Alessia M.)

“Docile Bodies”: Femininity and the Cyborg Body in Marissa Meyer’s “Cinder” (Jessica D. and Mel R.)

In Sandra Barkty’s article “Foucault, Femininity, and Modernization of Patriarchal Power”, she takes Foucault’s idea of docile bodies that we studied in the last week, and performs a gendered analysis. She discusses Foucault’s idea of the panopticon, citing that “[t]he effect of this is ‘to induce in the inmate a state of consciousness and permanent … Continue reading “Docile Bodies”: Femininity and the Cyborg Body in Marissa Meyer’s “Cinder” (Jessica D. and Mel R.)

Racialization of the Cyborg Body in “Marissa Meyer’s”Cinder (Mirlande D. and Karen P.)

  In Cinder, Marissa Meyer wrote Cinder’s character to inhabit a cyborg body. We argue that this has only resulted in her racialization. Coming away from the understanding of race as colour, we are analyzing racialization under a different lens. A lens that sees the outcomes of racialization constructing bodies as expendable and less than. Because of … Continue reading Racialization of the Cyborg Body in “Marissa Meyer’s”Cinder (Mirlande D. and Karen P.)

Talking Bodies: The Abject and Bodily Inscription in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Julia V. and Sarah G.)

Initially published by Charles Perrault in 1697 (Britannica), “Cinderella” continues to evolve in Children’s Literature as a beloved tale of oppression, magic, and triumph. The influence of the classic fairy tale is seen throughout popular culture in numerous tropes, plot devices and metaphors. Marissa Meyer’s Young Adult dystopian novel, Cinder, utilizes the structure of “Cinderella” … Continue reading Talking Bodies: The Abject and Bodily Inscription in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Julia V. and Sarah G.)

The Cyborg Race: Ethnic Discrimination in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (Hailey L. and Brianna B.)

In Marissa Meyer’s Cinder, human beings and cybernetic organisms coexist in society. Cyborgs are “a hybrid of machine and organism” that co-inhabit Earth with humans (Haraway 5). However, cyborgs are viewed as subhuman and are treated as objects. In this novel, the world is plagued with a lethal disease called letumosis, leading to the creation … Continue reading The Cyborg Race: Ethnic Discrimination in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (Hailey L. and Brianna B.)

A Room of One’s Own: Weaponized Capitalism in Lauren Oliver’s “Delirium” (By Meagan B and Ella L)

Lena, the protagonist of Lauren Oliver’s Delirium, is a character that has inspired much debate in our class. She is anxious, obedient, and unassertive, especially in comparison to Hana. However, different forces are at work in their lives. Lena is a victim of the weaponized capitalism of her society, unlike Hana, who has led a … Continue reading A Room of One’s Own: Weaponized Capitalism in Lauren Oliver’s “Delirium” (By Meagan B and Ella L)