Cinder vs. Cinderella (Margaret G. and Zoe D.)

While Disney was not the first one to tell the story of Cinderella this version of events has, arguably, become a classic. For the duration of this paper it is the Disney version of the tale that we will be discussing in reference to Marissa Meyer’s Cinder. When comparing the two works it is evident … Continue reading Cinder vs. Cinderella (Margaret G. and Zoe D.)

Construction of Girlhood and Femininity in Marissa Meyers Cinder: Disposing of the Damsel in Distress (Lydia W. and Chloe H.)

Published in 2014, Marissa Meyer’s Cinder retells Charles Perrault’s traditional fairy-tale Cinderella. Perrault’s Cinderella, despite being published in 1697 has and still holds an influential position in children’s literature. Meyer reconstructs the traditional, beloved tale of Cinderella by taking key points of the domestic patriarchal-led story and rewriting it through a feminist lens. Justyna Deszcz … Continue reading Construction of Girlhood and Femininity in Marissa Meyers Cinder: Disposing of the Damsel in Distress (Lydia W. and Chloe H.)

Subverting the Princess Narrative in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Diana B. and Alessia M.)

The 1950’s Disney produced film Cinderella, was one of best American animated and one of the most popularized films ever to be made. While young girls adored the idea of sparkling glass slippers, pumpkins that transformed into twinkling chariots, and ever-so dreamy yet unattainable princes, the Disney princess has been widely criticized by feminist scholars … Continue reading Subverting the Princess Narrative in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Diana B. and Alessia M.)

Talking Bodies: The Abject and Bodily Inscription in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Julia V. and Sarah G.)

Initially published by Charles Perrault in 1697 (Britannica), “Cinderella” continues to evolve in Children’s Literature as a beloved tale of oppression, magic, and triumph. The influence of the classic fairy tale is seen throughout popular culture in numerous tropes, plot devices and metaphors. Marissa Meyer’s Young Adult dystopian novel, Cinder, utilizes the structure of “Cinderella” … Continue reading Talking Bodies: The Abject and Bodily Inscription in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Julia V. and Sarah G.)