Cinder vs. Cinderella (Margaret G. and Zoe D.)

While Disney was not the first one to tell the story of Cinderella this version of events has, arguably, become a classic. For the duration of this paper it is the Disney version of the tale that we will be discussing in reference to Marissa Meyer’s Cinder. When comparing the two works it is evident … Continue reading Cinder vs. Cinderella (Margaret G. and Zoe D.)

Hyperempathy Syndrome and Normative Girlhood in Parable of the Sower (Kho S and Rachel W)

In Parable of the Sower, the main character Lauren has a fictional disease called hyper empathy syndrome, meaning she feels the pain and the pleasure of others. In their introduction, Day, Green-Barteet, and Monz discuss the Currie, Kelly, and Pomerantz article which states that narratives surrounding girlhood have “positioned young women in a space that … Continue reading Hyperempathy Syndrome and Normative Girlhood in Parable of the Sower (Kho S and Rachel W)

Post-Separation Studies: Race and Gender in Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (Laura B. and Aesha N.)

In her novel Orleans, Sherri L. Smith “connects the past to the future by imagining Hurricane Katrina to be the first in a series of extreme weather events leading to a post-Apocalyptic New Orleans” (Coleman 1). Smith’s post-apocalyptic New Orleans, however, disproportionately exposes women and Black individuals to devastation. Smith’s imagined world thereby examines gender … Continue reading Post-Separation Studies: Race and Gender in Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (Laura B. and Aesha N.)

Construction of Girlhood and Femininity in Marissa Meyers Cinder: Disposing of the Damsel in Distress (Lydia W. and Chloe H.)

Published in 2014, Marissa Meyer’s Cinder retells Charles Perrault’s traditional fairy-tale Cinderella. Perrault’s Cinderella, despite being published in 1697 has and still holds an influential position in children’s literature. Meyer reconstructs the traditional, beloved tale of Cinderella by taking key points of the domestic patriarchal-led story and rewriting it through a feminist lens. Justyna Deszcz … Continue reading Construction of Girlhood and Femininity in Marissa Meyers Cinder: Disposing of the Damsel in Distress (Lydia W. and Chloe H.)

Subverting the Princess Narrative in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Diana B. and Alessia M.)

The 1950’s Disney produced film Cinderella, was one of best American animated and one of the most popularized films ever to be made. While young girls adored the idea of sparkling glass slippers, pumpkins that transformed into twinkling chariots, and ever-so dreamy yet unattainable princes, the Disney princess has been widely criticized by feminist scholars … Continue reading Subverting the Princess Narrative in Marissa Meyer’s Cinder (by Diana B. and Alessia M.)

The Implications of Close Female Friendships in Lauren Oliver’s Delirium (Catherine Z. and Zoe H.)

        Close female friendships play interesting roles in young adult (YA) dystopian fiction, often serving as literary tools for the development of the protagonist and the progression of the plot. Within the genre, the close female friend typically follows the same trajectory, ultimately helping the protagonist grow into a stronger, more rebellious … Continue reading The Implications of Close Female Friendships in Lauren Oliver’s Delirium (Catherine Z. and Zoe H.)

Femininity As ‘Disability’ In Parable Of The Sower (Angie K. & Jennifer B.)

Lauren, the protagonist in Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of The Sower, is represented as a powerful female character. While the world around her is crumbling she is one of few characters who seems to understand the dire situation of the world and who wants to do something about it. Her stepmother, Cory, and her friend, … Continue reading Femininity As ‘Disability’ In Parable Of The Sower (Angie K. & Jennifer B.)

Girls on Fire: Constructions of Girlhood in YA Dystopian Fiction (by Dr. G-B)

Welcome to English 3900F and Women's Studies 3315F! This is a cross-listed course in which we will consider how girls and girlhood have been constructed in contemporary examples of Young Adult (YA) dystopian fiction. In Girl Power: Girls Redefining Girlhood, Dawn H. Currie, Deirdre M. Kelly, and Shauna Pomerantz point to the fact that “until … Continue reading Girls on Fire: Constructions of Girlhood in YA Dystopian Fiction (by Dr. G-B)