Girls on Fire: Girlhood in YA Dystopian Fiction, Course Descripton

In Girl Power: Girls Redefining Girlhood, Dawn H. Currie, Deirdre M. Kelly, and Shauna Pomerantz point to the fact that “until recently, girlhood has been ‘the other’ of feminism’s womanhood: girlhood was defined negatively, against womanhood” in ways that present adult femininity as the successful abandonment of young or adolescent womanhood (4). Currie, Kelly, and … Continue reading Girls on Fire: Girlhood in YA Dystopian Fiction, Course Descripton

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Blog Assignment, Directions

Blog Assignment As part of our work together, we will maintain a collaborative course blog called Girls on Fire: Constructions of Girlhood in YA Dystopian Fiction. It is an online forum designed to expand on our readings and discussions. YA dystopian and speculative fiction are rich and diverse genres. Given the recent explosion in texts … Continue reading Blog Assignment, Directions

Post-Separation Studies: Race and Gender in Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (Laura B. and Aesha N.)

In her novel Orleans, Sherri L. Smith “connects the past to the future by imagining Hurricane Katrina to be the first in a series of extreme weather events leading to a post-Apocalyptic New Orleans” (Coleman 1). Smith’s post-apocalyptic New Orleans, however, disproportionately exposes women and Black individuals to devastation. Smith’s imagined world thereby examines gender … Continue reading Post-Separation Studies: Race and Gender in Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (Laura B. and Aesha N.)

Using the Delta Fever to Reassert AIDS into the Current Discourse: An Analysis of Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (By Sam E. and Alison R.)

In Sherri L. Smith’s novel Orleans, disease is a key plot element. We argue that the Delta Fever (DF) parallels HIV/AIDS through the construction of the disease as a blood-borne virus treated as highly contagious by caretakers. Gross, Goldsmith and Carruth argue that HIV/AIDS discourse for young people has been silenced. Referencing Michel Foucault, we … Continue reading Using the Delta Fever to Reassert AIDS into the Current Discourse: An Analysis of Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans (By Sam E. and Alison R.)

“You speak like a little lady and your skin be smooth”: Blood and Bodily Purity in Orleans (Abbie J and Sarah L)

The society presented in Sherri Smith’s Orleans is not emphatically divided by race, class, or gender. Unlike other YA dystopian protagonists (such as Katniss Everdeen or Pressia Belze), Fen de la Guerre does not live in a culture of Have and Have Not. Instead, the ruins of New Orleans are divided among blood tribes, and … Continue reading “You speak like a little lady and your skin be smooth”: Blood and Bodily Purity in Orleans (Abbie J and Sarah L)

‘She Knows the Doll Head Because it’s Part of Her’: The Body in Pure (By Noortje K, Jen T and Alexandria R)

The construction of Pressia’s body in Pure sees signifiers inscribed on the body in a very literal way. Foucalt sees the body as an ‘object and target of power’—it can be ‘manipulated and shaped’ (136), and the population outside the Dome have bodies that have been literally manipulated and shaped by the Detonation. This theme … Continue reading ‘She Knows the Doll Head Because it’s Part of Her’: The Body in Pure (By Noortje K, Jen T and Alexandria R)

Creepily Twisted YA Tropes in Julianna Baggott’s Pure (Madyson White and Selena Huband)

Julianna Baggott’s Pure is a Young Adult novel that, from a first appearance, seems like a typical YA dystopian that follows the tropes of the genre. Pure contains a great deal of these tropes but it also distorts them to set the tone of a darker dystopian novel. Some of the twisted tropes of YA … Continue reading Creepily Twisted YA Tropes in Julianna Baggott’s Pure (Madyson White and Selena Huband)